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Descendants of Thomas Hamiter



Generation No. 1

1.  THOMAS1 HAMITER was born 1710 in Dutchy of Wurtemmberg, Germany, and died 1774 in Newberry County, South Carolina.  He married CATHERINA UNKNOWN 1730 in Wuerttemberg, Germany.  

Notes for THOMAS HAMITER:
Thomas Hamiter was born in 1710 in Dutchy of Wurttemberg, Germany. He died
after 1774 in Little Mountain, Newberry County, South Carolina. He was buried in Little Mountain, Newberry County, South Carolina. Thomas Hamiter immigrated from Germany to South Carolina in 1752. He and his family arrived in Charleston, South Carolina in late September on the ship Rowand. The Rowand was one of a group of four ships that had sailed from Rotterdam in the summer of 1752 with about fifteen hundred Germans bound for South Carolina. The first two ships of the group, which I believe were the Cunlift and Rowand, arrived in Charleston Harbor prior to September 27, 1752 with an estimated eight hundred Germans on board, and the Council was informed that the remaining two ships of the group were expected to enter harbor shortly with a like number of German settlers on board. The vast majority of this group of fifteen hundred emigrants did not indicate where they were from, and those that did usually only mentioned that they were from Germany in their petitions to colonial authorities to receive the “Bounty”. Research by Genealogist and Historians over the years has proven conclusively that most of this group were from the Duchies of Wurtemburg and Baden.
However, I feel it should be noted that a small percentage of the group were actually of Swiss origin but residing in Germany.
October 16, 1752, Thomas petitioned the authorities of the Crown Colony of South
Carolina to receive the “Bounty” offered to foreign protestants who were willing to
immigrate to South Carolina and settle in the previously uninhabited back country of the provience. In his petition to obtain the “Bounty”, Thomas stated “that he had come down from Germany and shipped himself and his family to this country because of the encourgement given to foreign protestants.” He furthur stated he had a wife (not named) and the following children: Catherina age 19; John age 17; Barbara age 15; Michael age 11. Thomas then requested that he be granted 300 acres of land on the bounty between the Broad and Saluda Rivers. October 20, 1752, Thomas was issued a warrent for 300 acres in the fork of the Saluda and Broad Rivers.
December 15, 1752, Thomas had a survey made of 300 acres of land on a branch of Cannon’s Creek. This tract of land was bounded on northeast by land of Ullerick Sliegh, on the southeast by the land of Henry Gallman and Christian Lever, on the northwest by the land of Corn Siegler and vacant land. The 300 acres of land was granted to Thomas September was granted to Thomas September 3, 1754. I think it is interesting to note that both Corn Siegler and Ullerick Sliegh were passengers on the Cunlift which arrived in Charleston at the same time as the Rowand. Christian (a.k.a. Christopher) Lever had been at this location since 1748 or earlier.
March 23, 1763, Thomas sold 150 acres of the 300 acre tract to Martin Fike. Martin’s Memorial of the tranaction states that the 150 acres was a portion of the 300 acres that were granted to Thomas September 3, 1754. In 1774, Thomas paid Quit Rent or what we would call property tax on the remaining 150 acres of the original tract. The Quit Rent Record states that the payment on the 150 acres granted in 1754 was made by Thomas Hamertor. Thomas had been in South Carolina for 22 years, but this was the first time that any official document spelled his name similar to the common spelling we use today. Also, in my opinion this record proves conclusively that Thomas was the Patriach of the Hamiter family in South Carolina. I have no further record of Thomas after 1774.

Notes for CATHERINA UNKNOWN:
I believe Catherine or Catherina was the first name of Thomas’s wife. I base that on a dower signature which is just about illegible. Therefore, I really don’t know for certain. I have no verifiable data on who his daughter married or for that matter if they mat\rried at all. A genealogist researching the Yonce family claims that John Yonce, son of Mathias Yonce married Margaret Hamiter of Germany about 1767. Unless Thomas had another daughterafter 1752, John’s wife may have been either of Thomas’s daughters. As far as I know, there were no other Hamiter females available.  He was married to Catherina about 1730 in Germany. Catherina was born in Wurttemberg, Germany.
    
Children of THOMAS HAMITER and CATHERINA UNKNOWN are:
    i.    CATHERINA2 HAMITER, b. 1734.
2.    ii.    JOHANN SEBASTIAN HAMITER, b. 1735, Dutchy of Wurtemmberg, Germany; d. Bef. 1790, Richland County, South Carolina.
    iii.    BARBARA HAMITER, b. 1737.
    iv.    MICHAEL HAMITER, b. 1741.
    v.    GEORGE SIMON HAMITER, b. Aft. 1752.


Generation No. 2

2.  JOHANN SEBASTIAN2 HAMITER (THOMAS1) was born 1735 in Dutchy of Wurtemmberg, Germany, and died Bef. 1790 in Richland County, South Carolina.

Notes for JOHANN SEBASTIAN HAMITER:
Johann Sebastian Hamiter was born about 1735 in Dutchy of Wurttemberg,
Germany. He died before 1790 in Cedar Creek Area, Richland County, South Carolina. He was buried in Cedar Creek Area, Richland County, South Carolina. On 16 July 1773, John Hammeter had a survey done for 150 acres of land on Cedar Creek.[Pre-revolution Plats, Volume 15, Page 274]
On 17 January 1775, John Hammeter recorded a memorial indicating that this land had been granted to him.[Memorials, Volume 13, Page 243 and Royal Grants 1695 - 1776, Volume 32, Page 95]
John Hamiter, Thomas’s first son, was 17 according to Thomas’s Bounty petition when the family arrived in Charleston in 1752. I think there is a good possibility that he actually arrived in America September 24, 1753 on the Neptune at Philadelphia . It was not unusual for older sons and in at least one case husbands to remain in Rotterdam with excess baggage or to conduct unfinished family business. They would then book passage on the next available ship.
John Sebastion Hammeter, note the spelling, arrived in Philadelphia, on the Neptune and then disappeared. I have spent years of research trying to locate this fellow in all of the colonies and the only records I can find, that refer to a Johannes Hammeter, are those here in South Carolina.
I have not found any record on a Johannes Sebastion Hammeter.John Hamiter married prior to 1760. I don't know at this time his wife's name. Hoever, I can assure you that he didn't marry an Indian names Juanita Whiterain as proposed by one well meaning but misguided family historian.
John Hammeter (Hamiter) had 150 acres of land surveyed on Cedar Creek of Broad River July 16, 1773. January 17, 1775 this tract of land was granted to John Hamiter.
What I think is really worth noting here is that the exact same spelling of the surname used by Johannes Sebastion Hammeter in 1753 is what appears on these documents. One thing that has always puzzled me about this grant is that John could have claimed headrights on at least 3 more children, but did not. John was still living in 1783, but is not listed in the census of 1790.
    
Children of JOHANN SEBASTIAN HAMITER are:
    i.    MARY EVE3 HAMITER, b. 1758.
3.    ii.    ADAM FREDERICK HAMITER, b. 1763, Cedar Creek Area, Richland Co., SC; d. December 15, 1822, Richland Co., SC.
4.    iii.    JACOB HAMITER, b. 1764, Richland County, South Carolina; d. September 21, 1816, Lexington County, South Carolina.
    iv.    ELIZABETH HAMITER, b. 1767.


Generation No. 3

3.  ADAM FREDERICK3 HAMITER (JOHANN SEBASTIAN2, THOMAS1) was born 1763 in Cedar Creek Area, Richland Co., SC, and died December 15, 1822 in Richland Co., SC.  He married BARBARA REBSAMEN.  She was born 1758 in Orangeburg District, SC, and died 1825 in Richland Co., SC.

Notes for ADAM FREDERICK HAMITER:
. Adam Frederick Hamiter was born in 1763 in Cedar Creek Area, Richland County, South Carolina.
He died on 15 Dec 1822 in Richland County, South Carolina. He was buried on 16 Dec 1822. Adam was a member of the German Protestant Church, called Appii Forun, on Cedar Creek, Richland County, Camden District, South Carolina.
In 1820 Adam was living in Richland County, South Carolina. There was 1 male over 45 years old, 2 males 18 to 26 years old, and 1 female over 45 years old.
The Revolutionary War records show that Adam Hamiter served as a footman fifteen days in 1781 and one hundred and five days in 1782 under Col. Thomas Taylor. His Captain was L ewis Pope. [Revolutionary Archives in South Carolina No. 3269]
During the Revolutionary War, he served in the South Carolina Militia unit commanded by Jacob Turnipseed who was future wife's brother.
Rev. Pierce conducted the funeral services for Adam Frederick Hamiter on 16 December 1822.
Adam Frederick Hamiter is listed in the DAR Patriot List.
    
Children of ADAM HAMITER and BARBARA REBSAMEN are:
    i.    NANCY4 HAMITER, m. GEORGE TURNIPSEED.
    ii.    SUCKY HAMITER.
    iii.    FREDERICK HAMITER.
    iv.    DAVID FREDERICK HAMITER.
    v.    MARY M. HAMITER.
    vi.    JOHN ADAM TURNIPSEED HAMITER.
5.    vii.    JOHN GEORGE HAMITER, b. January 22, 1795, Cedar Creek Area, Richland Co., SC; d. May 07, 1845, Pickens Co., Alabama.


4.  JACOB3 HAMITER (JOHANN SEBASTIAN2, THOMAS1) was born 1764 in Richland County, South Carolina, and died September 21, 1816 in Lexington County, South Carolina.  He married HARRIETTE NANCY BICKLEY 1794 in Lexington County, South Carolina.  She was born 1775 in Lexington County, South Carolina, and died September 23, 1820 in Lexington County, South Carolina.

Notes for JACOB HAMITER:
Jacob Hamiter was born in 1764 in Cedar Creek Area, Richland County, South
Carolina. He died on 21 Sep 1816 in Lexington County, South Carolina. He was buried on 22 Sep 1816 in Lexington County, South Carolina. After the marriage Jacob moved from the Cedar Creek area of Richland County to a tract of land located in Lexington County at the point where Camping Creek flowed into the Saluda River. Both Jacob and Herriette are buried in a family plot on the tract mentioned above which is now inundated by Lake Murry.
Frances Hamiter, John Hamiter, and David Hamiter, above 14 years entitled to estate from deceased Aunt, Nancy Dickey. Pray appointment of Guardian Thomas Shuler. Richland Equity 154 filed 17 July 1820.
Jacob Hamiter owned a two acre island in the Saluda River "bounded by water and lying near Jacob Hamiter's land on east side of river". The courthouse in Lexington was burned by Sherman in 1865, so no deed could be found.
Newberry County records show that on 17 April 1806 that Jacob Hamiter sold his
interest in one hundred and fifty acres of land in that county to Jacob Schumpert. His wife Nancy Hamiter, also signed the deed which can be found in Volume K, Page 155 in the office of the Clerk of Newberry County.
Richland County record show that Jacob Hamiter attended a sale there in 1805 and purchases a lot of tin.
In 1800 Jacob was living in Lexington County, South Carolina. There was 1 male less than ten, 1 male 16 to 26, 1 male 26 to 45, and 1 female 16 to 26.

Notes for HARRIETTE NANCY BICKLEY:
Harriette "Nancy" Bickley was born in 1775 in Lexington County, South Carolina. She died on 23 Sep 1820 in Lexington County, South Carolina. She was buried on 25 Sep 1820 in Lexington County, South Carolina.
    
Children of JACOB HAMITER and HARRIETTE BICKLEY are:
    i.    FRANCIS A.4 HAMITER, b. June 29, 1801.
6.    ii.    JOHN TYLER HAMITER, b. September 22, 1802, Lexington County, South Carolina; d. February 02, 1864, Oak Hill Plantation, Bossier Parish, LA.
    iii.    CHARLOTTE HAMITER, b. 1804.
    iv.    DAVID HAMITER, b. January 24, 1805, South Carolina; m. RHODA.
    v.    JOEL HAMITER, b. 1807.


Generation No. 4

5.  JOHN GEORGE4 HAMITER (ADAM FREDERICK3, JOHANN SEBASTIAN2, THOMAS1) was born January 22, 1795 in Cedar Creek Area, Richland Co., SC, and died May 07, 1845 in Pickens Co., Alabama.  He married MARY FRANCES SCOTT April 02, 1818 in Richland Co., SC.  She was born February 24, 1802 in Richland Co., SC, and died May 25, 1878 in Pickens Co., Alabama.

Notes for JOHN GEORGE HAMITER:
He was buried in May 1845 in Hamiter Family Cemetery, Pickens County, Alabama. He died on 7 May 1845 in Pickens County, Alabama. According to family tradition, John George changed his name after Adam Frederick Hamiter died in 1822 to George Frederick Hamiter in honor of his father and to prevent others from being confused due to the fact that he and his younger brother had the same first
name "John". Both George and his wife Mary Frances are buried in the Hamiter Family Cemetery four miles southeast of Carrlooton, Alabama on what was commonly known as the Claude Phillips Farm. George Frederick died of measels 7 May 1845.

Notes for MARY FRANCES SCOTT:
She was buried in May 1878 in Hamiter Family Cemetery, Pickens
County, Alabama. She died on 25 May 1878 in Pickens County, Alabama.
    
Children of JOHN HAMITER and MARY SCOTT are:
    i.    DANIEL WESLEY5 HAMITER.
    ii.    WILLIAM SCOTT HAMITER.
7.    iii.    M.D. GEORGE WASHINGTON HAMITER, b. 1823, Richland, SC; d. 1895, Texas.
    iv.    MARY ANNE ELIZABETH HAMITER.
    v.    FRANCES WESTON HAMITER.

Notes for FRANCES WESTON HAMITER:
Born on 18 Oct 1827 in Cedar Creek Area, Richland County, South Carolina. She died on 23 Nov 1839 in Pickens County, Alabama. She was buried in Hamiter Family Cemetery, Pickens County, Alabama. Frances was baptized by Rev. Reddick Pierce. She died young without marrying.

    vi.    NANCY MARGARET HAMITER.

Notes for NANCY MARGARET HAMITER:
Born on 9 May 1833 in Cedar Creek Area, Richland County, South Carolina. She was buried in Feb 1836 in Hamiter Family Cemetery, Pickens County, Alabama. She died on 24 Feb 1836 in Pickens County, Alabama. Nancy was baptized by Rev. Joseph Holmes. She died young without marrying.

    vii.    JOEL JAMES HAMITER.

Notes for JOEL JAMES HAMITER:
Born on 13 Apr 1836 in Pickens County, Alabama. He died on 29 Mar 1884 in Naruma, Burnett County, Texas. He was buried in Naruma, Burnett County, Texas. Joel was baptized by Rev. George Schaeffer. Joel fought in the Civil War in Company H, 11th Alabama Regiment, under General Robert E. Lee. The Company called themselves the Pickens County Guards, which fought primarly in Virginia with the Army of Northern Virginia.. After returning from the war he moved to
Texas. Joel never married.

    viii.    HIRAM PICKINS HAMITER.

Notes for HIRAM PICKINS HAMITER:
Born on 30 Sep 1838 in Pickens County, Alabama. He was buried in Sep 1854 in Hamiter Family Cemetery, Pickens County, Alabama. He died on 3 Sep 1854 in Pickens County, Alabama. Hiram was baptized by Rev. George Schaeffer. He died young without marrying.

    ix.    JOHN TYLER HAMITER, b. August 26, 1841, Pickens Co., Alabama; d. November 07, 1926, Pasquotank County, North Carolina; m. MARGARET ANNE MCAFFERTY, November 07, 1865; b. October 19, 1847; d. October 08, 1893.

Notes for JOHN TYLER HAMITER:
He was buried in Union Chapel Cemetery, Carrolton, Pickens County, Alabama. John Tyler Hamiter planned to follow his brother, George Washington Hamiter, into the medical field, but he joined Company H, 11th Alabama Regiment, Confederate Army under General Robert E. Lee. His Company was known as the Pickens County Guards. He was wounded three times during his military service; once in the leg, once in the head, and once in the arm. The leg wound was rather
serious, the head wound was a glancing wound, and the arm a flesh wound. During his remaining lifetime he suffered with severe headaches, which he attributed to his head wound.
The following is from the book, The History of Pickens County, Alabama 1540-1920:
"On August 6, 1892 the office of sheriff was won by the well known Civil War Veteram Mr. John Tyler Hamiter. Sheriff Hamiter was the son of John William Hamiter (sic), who came to Pickens County from Richland District, South Carolina. He was born and reared in this county, first seeing daylight on August 26, 1841.
"Sheriff Hamiter returned from the war in good health and never convinced that the South lost the great struggle. There were many stories passed down through the years relating to Uncle Tyler and the Civil War. One of the most amusing stories took place after a reunion had been held at Chickamauga, which was attended by one Hiram Scott of Carrollton. Mr. Scott returned from the affair and had in his
possession two or three walking canes as souvenirs. He approched Uncle Tyler and told of having met a yankee vetern at the reunion and during their conversation the yankee asked Mr. Scott where he was from and upon finding he was from Carrollton, the yankee gave Mr. Scott a walking-cane to give to
Sheriff Hamiter for he (the yankee) knew that UNcle Tyler needed a cane after having been on the run during the entire war. All this took place in the rear of W. G. (Billy) Robertson's store before a large pre-arranged crowd and some of the old people said it was two or three days before Uncle Tyler quited down.
"Sheriff Hamiter served the entire war, took part in some of the fieriest battles as a member of Company H, 11th Alabama Regiment, under Wilcox. "Sheriff Hamiter made the County agood law officer, serving his entire term without serious incident. He was very outspoken and madee no secret of where he stood on any subject that arose. He was one of the strongest leaders in the country during
the days of the Radical Republican Carpetbagger Scalawag days."
During the latter days of his life, John Tyler Hamiter Sr., and his wife Julia, lived with his son John Tyler Jr., in a large country home known as the Lipsey-Hamiter Home, built in 1837 and burned in 1939. This home was approximately four miles southeast of Carrollton, Alabama. John Tyler Hamiiter Sr., died of pneumonia on November 7, 1926.
The following is the obituary of John Tyler Hamiter Sr., published in the Pickens County Herald/West Alabamaian on November 111, 1926:
"John Tyler Hamiter, prominent citizen and one time sheriff of Picken, died at his home four miles east of Carrollton Sunday night at 10:00 o'clock, from an attack of pneumonia. He was taken sick more than two weeks prior to his death, but was never able to fight off the disease.
"Mr. Hamiter was born August 26, 1841, near Carrollton, and lived his whole life here. He volunteered as a private at the beginning of the Civil War, fought throughout the entire war without being capyured, but was wounded three times. He engaged in some of the fiercest battles of Virginia. He was a member of
Company H, 11th Alabama, under Wilcox, and his comrades who survived said he was as brave as ever went into a battlefield.
"Mr. Hamiter was elected sherriff of this county many years ago and made a splended officer. Hemaintained the same fearless spirit in office as he did on the battlefield. He was fair and just to his fellowman, and his word was his bond. He was considered one of the strongest and most active men of his age in the county, and was till his last illness. He was popular wherever he was known, and took active interest in all matters, political, religious and social. The county loses one of the best men in the death of Mr. Hamiter.
"He is survived by his widow and two sons, W. F. Hamiter and J. T. Hamiter Jr., all citizens of Carrollton beat. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. E. Kaylor, pastor of the Methodist Church of Carrollton, of which he was a member. He was buried at Union Chapel Cemetery five miles south of Carrollton Monday afternoon. Despite a heavy down pour of rain all afternoon, a large number of friends over the county attended the funeral services, and the floral offering was evidence of the esteem his friends had for him. Mr. Hamiter will be greatly missed by his friends in Carrollton. He came to town, practicall every day when he was not busy on his plantation, and was greeted by old and young alike, as Uncle Tyler. He was a great friend to the young men and children, and never passed them without a friendly greeting."
He was married to Margaret Ann McCafferty on 7 Nov 1865 in Pickens County, Alabama. Margaret Ann McCafferty was born on 19 Oct 1847 in Pickens County, Alabama. She was buried in Oct 1893 in Union Chapel Cemetery, Carrolton, Pickens County, Alabama. She died on 8 Oct 1893 in Pickens County, Alabama.


6.  JOHN TYLER4 HAMITER (JACOB3, JOHANN SEBASTIAN2, THOMAS1) was born September 22, 1802 in Lexington County, South Carolina, and died February 02, 1864 in Oak Hill Plantation, Bossier Parish, LA.  He married PATIENCE HODGES April 14, 1833 in Twiggs County, Georgia.  She was born November 24, 1805 in Twiggs County, Georgia, and died June 01, 1848 in Oak Hill Plantation, Bossier Parish, LA.

Notes for JOHN TYLER HAMITER:
John Tyler Hamiter was born on 22 Sep 1802 in Lexington County, South
Carolina. He died on 2 Feb 1864 in Oak Hill Plantation, Bossier Parish, Louisiana. He was buried on 4 Feb 1864 in Hamiter Family Cemetery, Bossier Parish, Louisiana. On 17 July 1820, the children of Jacob and Nancy Hamiter filed a petition in Richland County for their share of the estate of their aunt, Nancy Bickley. In this petion they stated that their father, Jacob Hamiter, had recently doed and they had no guardian legally qualified to take charge of the management thereof. Thomas Shular was appointed guardian. [Richland County Petitions, Roll 154, year 1820]
In the early 1840's John and David Hamiter with several other families decided to move to Louisiana. They met in the little village of Haynesville, Houston County, Georgia. Altogether there were thirty whites and about two hunmdred slaves. They arrived at Minden, Louisiana on Christmas day 1840.
They camped nearby that night. The next day they passed through Bellevue and on to a place called Sugar Hill.
John Hamiter settled in the northwest corner of Bossier Parish, Louisiana. On 1 June 1844 he bought nine hundred and fifty-two acres of land from
At the time of the Civil War he was a wealthy man, owning much land and many slaves. He was also engaged in many enterprises. He was one of the founders of the Red Land Seminary in 1859.
When his wife Patience died on 1 June 1848. He selected a burial plot on their
plantation and she was laid to rest a short distance from their home. The plot is still used by some of their descendants today.
In 1955 the plantation was owned by two of John's Great-grandsons, Harry and Emmet Wyche, sons of Harry Chambers and Mary Rabb Wyche.
The following is from Aletha Barker Hamiter's research done inn 1955: "John Hamiter's home 'Oak Hill' was on the Washington, Arkansas and Natchitoches, Louisiana Military Road, about six miles south of Lafayette County, Arkansas line. This road was the only one extending north and south in the western part of the country and was the mail route between Washington, Arkansas and Natchitoches, Louisiana. It was much traveled by Confederate soliders and couriers during the Civil War and many of them stopped at Oak Hill for rest and refreshments.
"One dollar per night was charged for the keep of either man or horse. The price
remained the same during the years of this record, but the price of shoeing a horse round advanced from four dollars in 1856 to ten dollars in 1863. Ocaisionally some officers would come by and pay with Confederate currency the bills made by couriers and horses. Among officers most mentioned were Major Heard, Captain Benjamin Turner, Captain J. P. Ingram, and Captain Randle.
"Besides operating a blacksmith shop and a large plantation, John Hamiter engaged in many other enterprises. Among them were a sawmill, grist mill, shoe shop, and store or commissary. The work was all done by slaves, each trained for his special job. One trained as a carpender was sometimes hired out to neighbors for rwo dollars per day.
"The citizens of the southern part of Lafayette County, Arkansas, patronized him almost as his own parrishioners, especially the citiizens of the historical settlement of Walnut Hill, which was about twelve miles north of his home. Among the names from Walnut Hill is that of Mrs. James S. Conway, widow of the first governor of the State of Arkansas.
"An interesting item, charged to a gentleman from Walnut Hill, was the ironing of four slaves at a cost of three dollars each in August of 1863.
The irons were removed in December of the same year at a cost of a dollar each.
"The first entry for money paid out for catching runaway slaves was in 1863. The price of slaves at that time seemed to average from seven to eight hundred dollars each.
"In 1856 he gave his daughter Mrs. Catherine Wyche, fifteen slaves valued at ten thousand dollars and ten thousand dollars in cash, and his daughter, Mrs. Harriet Bryne, fifteen slaves valued at ten thousand dollars and ten thousand dollars in cash. In 1853 he gave his son, John Hodges Hamiter of Walnut Hill, twenty slaves valued at twenty thousand dollars.
"His overseers were paid from fifty to seventy-five dollars and their keep per month.
"There were many entries for grinding malt and mending stills, and in 1863 John Hamiter lent one person thirty-ywo hundred dollars to buy stills.
"There was much paying of debts by exchange of commodities and notes, es[ecially in 1863. The absance of charges for corn, peas, and potatoes, also grinding of meal in 1863, indicates a dry year.
"Much of John Hamiter's cotton and beef were taken over by the Confederate States Government and notes given for them.
"In 1862 some cotton was sent by wagon to Shreveport and then by boat to Baton Rouge, Louisiana and sold at ten cents per pound. On one of these trips a slave took sick and died and was buried in Shreveport at a cost of ten dollars.
"The most common entries made for dry goods during that time were for Omaburge, lindsey, cottonade, cheap shoes, and hats. Most charges for shoes were from one dollar and fifty cents to one dollar and seventy-five cents per pair. One entry of interest is that of an overcoat at sixteen dollars, boots for four dollars, and eighteen yards of fine shirting at twelve and one-half cents per yard, sold to Dr. William B. Searcy in 1858.
"Another physician of that time who practiced for John Hamiter was Dr. J. M. Nuckols who lived near what is now the town of Plain Dealing, Louisiana.
"Corn and peas advanced from seventy-five cents in 1856 to two dollars and fifty cents per bushel in 1863. During the same time lard soared from fifteen to fifty cents per pound. In 1863 nails were one dollar per pound, lumber one-half cent per foot. Wool and copperas were one dollar per pound. Cowhide were eleven dollars each, deer hides three dollars each. In November of 1863 one pound of powder cost twelve dollars and a box of percussion caps fifteen dollars. A days haulin with an ox team was five dollars.
"The Louisiana Lake and Navigation Company employed some of John Hamiter's slaves for one dollar and fifty cents per day in 1860, but in November 1861 the price had risen to two dollars and fifty cents per day.
"There was no income tax, but a heavy military tax. The Confederate States Government sold bonds which bore seven per cent interest. Many thousand dollars worth of these bonds were owned by John Hamiter.
"In 1863 the war which brought havoc and destruction to the South had been in progress for more than two years, but the South was still confident of victory. They met their problems courageously, endured hardship and privation cheerfully and even wrested some joy from those precarious days.
"Horse racing was a favorite amusement, and on May 28, 1863 the spring races opened a Lewisville, Lafayette County, Arkansas. The greatest attraction was the race between 'Tubbs' imported filly owned by John Hamiter's son John Hodges Hamiter of Walnut Hill, and the filly 'Fannie Little' owned by Col. C. N. Little. The prize was five thousand dollars aside.
"Death ended the record kept by John Hamiter, February 2, 1864. He was buried in the family cemetery at his plantation home 'Oak Hill'. Time and decay have destroyed the home, but the name lives on in a properous settlement in that vicinity known as Oak Hill Community."

More About JOHN TYLER HAMITER:
Baptism (LDS): Greg's third great Grandfather

Notes for PATIENCE HODGES:
He was married to Patience Hodges (daughter of Edmund K. Hodges and Patience) on 14 Apr 1833 in Twiggs County, Georgia. Patience Hodges was born on 24 Nov 1805 in Twiggs County, Georgia. She was buried in Jun 1848 in Hamiter Family Cemetery, Bossier Parish, Louisiana. She died on 1 Jun 1848 in Oak Hill Plantation, Bossier Parish, Louisiana. The Souther Christian Advocate announced the death of Patience and also noted that she was the wife of John Tyler Hamiter.
    
Children of JOHN HAMITER and PATIENCE HODGES are:
    i.    HARRIET5 HAMITER, b. May 25, 1835.

Notes for HARRIET HAMITER:
She was buried in Feb 1902 in Hamiter Family Cemetery, Bossier Parish, Louisiana. She died on 3 Feb 1902 in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana.
She was married to Joseph N. Bryan on 20 Jul 1853 in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana. Joseph N. Bryan was born about 1853. He died about 1908.

    ii.    CATHERINE HAMITER, b. March 14, 1837.
    iii.    JOHN HODGES HAMITER, b. February 18, 1839.

Notes for JOHN HODGES HAMITER:
born on 18 Feb 1839 in Houston County, Georgia. He died on 20 Jul
1908 in Washington, Lafayette County, Arkansas. He was buried in Walnut Hill Cemetery, Walnut Hill,
Lafayette County, Arkansas. Before the Civil War John was a very wealthy man. He donated some land
for religious purposes where the white and colored cemeteries are at
Walnut Hill, also the ground across the road from the cemeteries, where
the black church is located. Around 1870 the land was used as a church
camp ground. His antebellum home and furniture burned while he and
hiswere attending a camp meeting there. When the camp meetings were
discontinued about 1880, the ground was donated to the Methodist Church
for a church building and cemetery. Among the first burials in the
cemetery was an infant son of his who died at birth in 1887.
He took an active part in local and county affairs. He was a Mason and a
member of the Order of Eastern Star. He was a tax assessor of Lafayette
County for more than twenty years. He was Sunday School Superintendent
ffor many years and a member of the board of Stewards of the Methodist
Church at Walnut Hill.
In 1888, when the Cotton Belt Railroad laid off the twn of Bradley and
built a depot, he was the first agent. He took over before the depot was
complete but never actually served in that capacity. His sons, John,
Allen, Emmet, Dickson, and Jewell were the working agents from the first
until 1903 when Jewell accepted work in Shreveport. He was also agent for
town lots which was owned by the railroad.
They never quite got over the effects of the slave days and tried in many
ways to maintain their pre Civil War way of life. Several of his slaves
and their descendents were still living on his plantation at the time of
his death.
The following is a quoted from a letter by John Hodges Hamiter Jr.: "John
Tyler Hamiter, son of John and Patience Hamiter, born February 1839,
entered the Confederate Army as a young Captain. He organized a company
at Washington, Arkansas, consisting of soldiers from Lafayette, Hempstead,
and Miller Counties. Mrs. Gaines of Washington, Arkansas, then a Miss
Jett, presented him with a flag in the courthouse at Washington, Arkansas.
But after his health failed and he did not see much active servicee. Right
after the surrender, or maybe alittle before, he was elected Colonel of
the Militia where he obtained the title of Colonel by which he was
addressed the rest of his life.
While in his teens he attended Center College in Kentucky, where he was a
classmate of Adalai Stevenson and his professor was James G. Blaine."
John Hodges Hamiter was a Captain, 26 Arkansas Infantry, Confederate
States Army.
He was married to Florence Lafayette Hicks on 2 Aug 1860 in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana.
Florence Lafayette Hicks was born on 22 Feb 1843 in Helena, Arkansas. She died on 13 Oct 1905 in
Washington, Lafayette County, Arkansas. She was buried in Walnut Hill Cemetery, Walnut Hill, Lafayette
County, Arkansas.

8.    iv.    ROBERT EDMUND HAMITER, b. January 16, 1843, Houston County, Georgia; d. January 05, 1923, Plain Dealing, LA.


Generation No. 5

7.  M.D. GEORGE WASHINGTON5 HAMITER (JOHN GEORGE4, ADAM FREDERICK3, JOHANN SEBASTIAN2, THOMAS1) was born 1823 in Richland, SC, and died 1895 in Texas.  He married ELIZA JANE WILLIAMS.  
    
Child of GEORGE HAMITER and ELIZA WILLIAMS is:
9.    i.    DELLA6 HAMITER, b. 1878, Texas; d. November 1963.


8.  ROBERT EDMUND5 HAMITER (JOHN TYLER4, JACOB3, JOHANN SEBASTIAN2, THOMAS1) was born January 16, 1843 in Houston County, Georgia, and died January 05, 1923 in Plain Dealing, LA.  He married (1) MARY ELLA FREEMAN in Plain Dealing, LA.  She was born April 28, 1861 in Plain Dealing, LA, and died June 06, 1918 in Louisiana.  He married (2) MARY CATHERINE DOOLEY June 10, 1868 in Layfayette County, Arkansas.  She was born February 21, 1846 in Layfayette County, Arkansas, and died July 30, 1882 in Plain Dealing, LA.

Notes for ROBERT EDMUND HAMITER:
Robert Edmund Hamiter was born on 16 Jan 1843 in Houston County, Georgia. He died on 5 Jan 1923 in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana. He was buried on 7 Jan 1923 in Hamiter Family Cemetery, Bossier Parish,Louisiana. Robert was a Sergeant in the Confederate Army. When the war ended he came home and found that his father had died and left him a large plantation, but all other wealth had been swept away by the Civil War.
     He was married to Mary Ella Freeman in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana. Mary Ella Freeman was born on 28 Apr 1861 in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana. She was buried in Jun 1918 in Hamiter Family Cemetery, Bossier Parish, Louisiana. She died on 6 Jun 1918 in Louisiana.
From Ancestry.com  Confederate Research Sources Vol. 2 page 168
Hamiter, R. E., Pvt. Hughe's Batty. Rolls of Prisoners of War, Paroled Shreveport, La., June 13, 1865.  Res. Bossier Par., La.

More About MARY CATHERINE DOOLEY:
Baptism (LDS): July 1882, buried in Hamiter Family Cemetery, Bossier Parish, LA
    
Children of ROBERT HAMITER and MARY FREEMAN are:
    i.    OBE6 HAMITER.
    ii.    MARY ELIZABETH HAMITER.
    iii.    MATTIE HAMITER.
    iv.    BOSSIER HAMITER.
    v.    DAVID HAMITER.
    vi.    HATTIE HAZEL HAMITER.
    vii.    LENA GLEN HAMITER.
    viii.    LELA DARKIN HAMITER.
    ix.    JOEL BIGGS HAMITER, b. January 24, 1886.

    
Children of ROBERT HAMITER and MARY DOOLEY are:
    x.    RACHEL PATIENCE6 HAMITER, b. September 03, 1870, Plain Dealing, LA; d. December 1969.
    xi.    MINNIE ADELL HAMITER, b. February 04, 1873.
10.    xii.    ROBERT EDMUND JR. HAMITER, b. January 26, 1876, Plain Dealing, LA; d. December 31, 1969, Plain Dealing, LA.
    xiii.    JOHN JAMES HAMITER, b. December 15, 1879.


Generation No. 6

9.  DELLA6 HAMITER (GEORGE WASHINGTON5, JOHN GEORGE4, ADAM FREDERICK3, JOHANN SEBASTIAN2, THOMAS1) was born 1878 in Texas, and died November 1963.  She married SAMUEL A. PHILLIPS 1900 in Texas.  
    
Child of DELLA HAMITER and SAMUEL PHILLIPS is:
    i.    THEO7 PHILLIPS.


10.  ROBERT EDMUND JR.6 HAMITER (ROBERT EDMUND5, JOHN TYLER4, JACOB3, JOHANN SEBASTIAN2, THOMAS1) was born January 26, 1876 in Plain Dealing, LA, and died December 31, 1969 in Plain Dealing, LA.  He married MARINA LUCRETIA ANDREWS.  She was born August 16, 1873 in Arcadia, Bienville Parish, Louisiana, and died January 13, 1968 in Plain Dealing, LA.

Notes for ROBERT EDMUND JR. HAMITER:
Robert Edmund Hamiter Jr. was born on 26 Jan 1876 in Plain Dealing, Bossier
Parish, Louisiana. He died on 2 Jan 1970 in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana. He was buried on 4 Jan 1970 in Hamiter Family Cemetery, Bossier Parish, Louisiana.
Robert and his family lived in the Oak Hill Community which took its name
from his grandfather's plantation home.

More About ROBERT EDMUND JR. HAMITER:
Baptism (LDS): January 04, 1970, Hamiter Family Cemetery, Bossier Parish, LA
Burial: January 02, 1970, Plaine Dealing Cemetery

Notes for MARINA LUCRETIA ANDREWS:
Marina "Rinie" Andrews was born on 16 Aug 1873 in Arcadia, Bienville Parish,
Louisiana. She died on 13 Jan 1968 in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana. She was buried in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana.

More About MARINA LUCRETIA ANDREWS:
Baptism (LDS): buried in Plain Dealing, LA
Burial: January 15, 1968, Plain Dealing Cemetery
    
Children of ROBERT HAMITER and MARINA ANDREWS are:
    i.    LILLE7 HAMITER.

Notes for LILLE HAMITER:
Lillie Hamiter was born in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana.
She was married to Seward in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana.

    ii.    KATIE HAMITER, b. November 13, 1893.

Notes for KATIE HAMITER:
Katie Hamiter was born on 13 Nov 1893 in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish,
Louisiana. She died on 19 May 1976 in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana. She
was buried on 21 May 1976 in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana.
She was married to James "Jim" Impson on 16 Nov 1913 in Plain Dealing, Bossier
Parish, Louisiana.

    iii.    MINNIE HAMITER, b. March 20, 1896; m. WILLIE COX.

Notes for MINNIE HAMITER:
Minnie Hamiter was born on 20 Mar 1896 in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish,
Louisiana. She died on 21 Nov 1982 in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana. She was
buried on 23 Nov 1982 in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana.
She was married to Willie Cox in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana.

    iv.    EDNA HAMITER, b. February 25, 1900, Plain Dealing, Louisiana; d. March 11, 1998, Marion, Illinois; m. DEWEY LEE RANDOLPH, February 09, 1918, Plain Dealing, LA; b. March 14, 1899, Dongola, IL Union Co.; d. July 29, 1985, Marion, IL.

Notes for EDNA HAMITER:
Edna Hamiter was born in Feb 25, 1900 in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana.  She died March 11, 1998 in Marion, IL.
She was married to Dewey Lee Randolph in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana.

Notes for DEWEY LEE RANDOLPH:
When Dewey was a young boy, his father, Jasper took him to Louisiana.  He was abandoned there.  Dewey worked on a plantation owned by Robert Edmund Hamiter.  There he met his future wife, Edna.

More About DEWEY LEE RANDOLPH:
Baptism (LDS): buried in Johnston City, IL

Marriage Notes for EDNA HAMITER and DEWEY RANDOLPH:
Found in 1920 U.S. Census - Louisiana
1920 U.S. Census • Louisiana • Bossier • Police Jury Ward 3 • ED# 23

D. L. Randolph 22 IL mill logger
Edna 20 LA
Vida 11 months IL

next door to Edna's parents...........
R. E. Hamiter 42 LA GA TX
Riney 46 LA AR MS
Jim 17 LA LA LA



    v.    JAMES E. HAMITER, b. February 20, 1902.

Notes for JAMES E. HAMITER:
James E. Hamiter was born on 20 Feb 1902 in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish,
Louisiana. He was buried on 31 Mar 1963 in Plain Dealing Cemetery, Plain Dealing,
Bossier Parish, Louisiana. He died on 29 Mar 1964 in Shreveport, Caddo Parish,
Louisiana.
He was married to Treba Elenora Winn on 24 Sep 1934 in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish,
Louisiana. Treba Elenora Winn was born on 6 Oct 1915 in Plain Dealing, Bossier
Parish, Louisiana. She died on 11 Sep 1961 in Shreveport, Caddo Parish, Louisiana. She
was buried in Plain Dealing Cemetery, Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana. James
E. Hamiter and Treba Elenora Winn had the following children:
i. Erma Doloris Hamiter.
 ii. James E. Hamiter Jr..

    vi.    MYRTICE HAMITER, b. 1904; m. HERBERT MARTIN JOLLY.

Notes for MYRTICE HAMITER:
Myrtice Hamiter was born in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana.
She was married to Herbert M. Jolly in Plain Dealing, Bossier Parish, Louisiana.

More About MYRTICE HAMITER:
Baptism (LDS): youngest of Hamiter children

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